International Institute of Medicine and Science, Inc. 
Dedicated to the Preservation and Betterment of  Human Lives Through Advanced Medical Sciences Research, Education, and Service to the Communities we Serve and Humanity 
A Member of the World Association of Non-Governmental Organizations (WANGO)              
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Conferences - Symposia

        The Institute is proud to organize or/and sponsor or/and support timely conferences and symposia on subjects of wide (national, international) interest. Agendas and other particulars are provided below:

                                                                                Under Planning:
      Sponsorship of the:    
                                                            FIRST INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON 
                                                         "EVOLUTIONARY LIFESTYLE AND HEALTH"

AGENDA
                                         
 
        The overarching theme of the Conference is the relationship between our evolutionary lifestyle choices and their influence on the causality, prevention and palliation of  diseases, particularly those afflicting the industrialized nations today. Major components of our lifestyle choices include some or all of the following: nutrition, physical activity, social arrangements, workplace, physical environment, sundry, use of alcohol and drugs, and other phenomena such as sleep patterns, spirituality and religion, and myth and ritual. 
        The Conference will begin with a brief review of the synthetic theory of evolution and its current controversies in order to provide a common reference point, and introduce the heart-brain system and its psychosomatic implications. It will continue with the concept of cardiac chaos and coherence to show how the variability of heart beats are associated with health problems due to stress and aging. After reviewing the new field of nutritional anthropology and its conclusions that most modern diseases are self-inflicted and we should adopt, at least in part, a lifestyle that is coherent with our anciently programmed minds and bodies, the Conference will systematically explore the connection between lifestyle factors and each modern disease. 

PLENARY SESSION 1: SYNTHETIC THEORY OF HUMAN EVOLUTION
  

        The synthetic theory of evolution (also called neo-darwinism or neo-darwinian synthesis) is the conceptual mechanism framework most widely used in the scientific study of evolutionary processes in biology. It is based on the integration of Mendel's heredity theory and populations' genetics to Darwin's theory. It is an extension of the original theory of Charles Darwin, which ignored the mechanisms of genetical heredity. The theory will be summarized and current controversies (adaptationism and neutralism; punctuated equilibria; neo-lamarckism or inheritance of traits acquired by parents - not a mutation; and complexity magnification in the course of evolution) will be reviewed.   
        Regular Sessions will include: The limbic brain; the cortical brain; the cortical brain's two hemispheres; the heart-brain system, emotional intelligence; and evolutionary psychology.     

PLENARY SESSION 2: CARDIAC CHAOS AND COHERENCE       

        In the states of stress, anxiety, depression or anger, the variability of the cardiac rhythm between two heartbeats becomes irregular or chaotic. In the states of well-being, compassion, or gratitude, this variability becomes coherent and the alternating accelerations and decelerations of the cardiac rhythm are regular. The lowering of the variability of heartbeats is associated with a set of health problems due to stress and aging: hypertension, cardiac deficiency, diabetes complications, infarctus of the myocardium, cancer and even sudden death. When the variability has disappeared, when the heart does not respond to emotions, death approaches. It is the negative emotions, anger, anxiety, and sadness that are most responsible for a drop in cardiac variability. Conversely, positive emotions, joy, gratitude, and particularly love, favor coherence. The state of cardiac coherence also influences the other physiological rhythms, particularly the natural variability of arterial pressure and respiration. These sessions will review current technology for evidencing cardiac chaos and coherence and how lifestyle changes can lead to notable improvements. It is not only a slowing down of the aging process, but a real rejuvenation of the physiology.
        Regular sessions will include: Current technologies; stress-related problems and their management. 

PLENARY SESSION 3: LIFESTYLE FACTORS AND EMOTIONAL DISEASES

        Whereas western medicine is unequaled for acute illnesses, it may  not be exemplary when it comes to chronic illnesses such as depression, anxiety, maniaco-depressive problems, stress, etc. The traditional pillars of western medicine for treating such emotional diseases, namely psychoanalysis and drugs, are under increasing attack for their lack of efficiency and high cost. Yet, the emotional brain (Session 2) controls the psychological well-being and a large part of the body's physiology: respiration, cardiac rythm, functioning of the heart, arterial tension, hormonal secretions, digestive system, appetite, sleep, libido, and even the immune system.  Emotional disorders are the consequence of dysfunctions in the emotional brain. Nonetheless, the emotional brain possesses natural mechanisms for self-healing. Other techniques, such as acupuncture, nutrition, affective communication, and methods of social integration have their sources in pluri-millenial medical traditions. Thus, the poor management  of emotions is a principal cause of obesity in a society where stress is omni-present and nutrition is abundantly utilized as a response to it.  
        Regular sessions will include: Brief review of neuro-emotional therapeutic methods not utilizing psychoanalysis or/and drugs (EMDR: eye movement desensitization and reprocessing, tuning of the internal biological clock, sunrise simulation, and acupuncture); and lifestyle factors modification (particularly, nutrition with emphasis on the omega-Cretean diet, physical exercise, love and affection, non-violent communication, social involvement ).  

PLENARY SESSION 4: NUTRITIONAL ANTHROPOLOGY
 
                                      
        Nutritional anthropology is the overarching new field that links anthropology and nutrition. It explains what it means to be a human being in nutritional terms. It provides a precise specification for the human diet, developed by our human ancestors over millenia past, and postulates that our bodies are designed to work according to those instructions and no others. Modern-day humans have changed very little, genetically speaking, and we are still living in bodies that Nature designed to thrive in that far off time. Examining our ancestors' way of life provides powerful clues to how we should be living today. These remarkable insights show how, in many surprising and unsuspected ways, we can make critical, life-transforming adjustments. One of the most troubling aspects of our busy lives is the constant bombardment of conflicting messages directed at us by the health and food industries. Nutritional anthropology brings peace of mind and enables everyone to judge for oneself. It claims that it gets at the root causes of the "diseases of civilization": cancer, heart disease, stroke, diabetes, obesity, arthritis, osteoporosis, Alzheimer's disease, and many more. This session will review the basic aspects of this exciting new field.

        Regular sessions will include: Population studies and biochemical clues; digestive system and dietary clues; cultural and psychological factors; nutritional models and personalized food pyramids; health diet; and raw foodism (or rawism).

PLENARY SESSION 5: LIFESTYLE FACTORS AND CANCER

        Cancer is a diverse class of more than 100 different diseases which differ widely in their causes and biology and in which a group of cells display "uncontrolled growth" (division beyond the normal limits), "invasion" (intrusion on, and destruction of, adjacent tissues), and sometimes "metastasis" (spread to other locations in the body via lymph or blood). These three malignant properties of cancer differentiate them from benign tumors, which are self-limited, and do not invade or metastasize. Most cancers form a tumor but some, like leukemia, do not. Cancer may affect people of all ages, even fetuses, but the risk for most varieties increases with age. Cancer causes about 13% of all deaths. According to the American Cancer Society, 7.6 million people died from cancer in the world during 2007. Cancer can also affect animals. Nearly all cancers are caused by abnormalities in the genetic material of the transformed cells ( 15%), poor dietary habits (30%), smoking (30%), infectious agents (5%), workplace-related exposure (5%), obesity and lack of exercise (5%), alcohol (3%), UV-ray exposure (2%), pollution (2%), drugs (1%), and others (1%). Other cancer-promoting genetic abnormalities may be randomly acquired through error in DNA replication, or are inherited, and thus present in all cells from birth. The heritability of cancers is usually affected by complex interactions between carcinogens and the host's genome. New aspects of cancer pathogenesis such as DNA-methylation and micro-RNAs are increasingly recognized as important. 
        Regular sessions will review: the causes of cancer, its mechanisms, its prevention, and reducing its risk factors. It will also compare the effects of chemotherapy and metronomic therapy," and the use of neutraceuticals to combat cancer.

PLENARY SESSION 6: LIFESTYLE FACTORS AND HEART DISEASE
 
        Cardiovascular diseases refer to the class of diseases that involve the heart or blood vessels (arteries and veins). While the term technically refers to any disease that affects the cardiovascular system, it is usually used to refer to atherosclerosis (arterial disease). The conditions have similar causes, mechanisms, and treatments. Most countries face high and increasing rates of cardiovascular disease. It is the number one cause of death and disability in the United States and most European countries (data available through 2005). A large histological study, the "
Pathological Determinants of Atherosclerosis in Youth (PDAY)"
study showed vascular injury accumulates from adolescence, making prevention efforts necessary from childhood. By the time that heart problems are detected, the underlying cause (atherosclerosis) is usually quite advanced, having progressed for decades. There is therefore increased emphasis on preventing atherosclerosis by reducing risk factors, such as lifestyle modification through stress reduction, healthy diet, exercise, and avoidance of smoking, which may prevent, eliminate or reduce nearly all forms of heart disease. Unlike many other chronic medical conditions, cardiovascular disease is treatable and reversible, even after a long history of disease. Treatment is primarily focused on diet and stress reduction. 
        Regular sessions will include: causes of cardiovascular disease, its mechanisms, and prevention particularly through lifestyle modification. 

PLENARY SESSION 7: LIFESTYLE FACTORS AND DIABETES

        Diabetes is a syndrome of disordered metabolism usually due to a combination of hereditary and environmental causes resulting in abnormally high blood sugar levels (hyperglycemia). Blood glucose levels are controlled by a complex interaction of multiple chemicals and hormones in the body, including the hormone insulin made in the beta cells of the pancreas.
Diabetes mellitus
refers to the group of diseases that lead to high blood glucose levels due to defects in either insulin secretion or insulin action in the body. Diabetes develops due to a diminished production of insulin (in type 1) or resistance to its effect (in type 2 and gestational). Both lead to hyperglycemia, which largely causes the acute signs of diabetes: excessive urine production, resulting compensatory thirst and increased fluid intake, blurred vision, unexplained weight loss, lethargy, and changes in energy metabolism. Diabetes and its treatments can cause many complications. Acute complications including hypoglycemia, ketoacidosis, or non-ketonic hyperosmolar coma may occur if the disease is not adequately controlled. Serious long-term complications include cardiovascular disease, chronic renal failure, retinal damage, which can lead to blindness, several types of nerve damage, and microvascular damage, which may cause erectile dysfunction and poor wound healing. Poor healing of wounds, particularly of the feet, can lead to gangrene, and possibly to amputation. Adequate treatment of diabetes, as well as increased emphasis on blood pressure control and lifestyle factors such as not smoking and maintaining a healthy body weight, may improve the risk profile of most of the chronic complications. In the developed world, diabetes is the most significant cause of adult blindness in the non-elderly and the leading cause of non-traumatic amputation in adults, and diabetic nephropathy is the main illness requiring renal dialysis. Among the body's systems affected by diabetes are the nervous, digestive, circulatory, endocrine and urinary systems.
        Regular sessions will include: diabetes classification, causes, mechanisms, and prevention particularly through lifestyle modification. 

REGULAR SESSION 8: LIFESTYLE FACTORS AND OSTEOPOROSIS

        Osteoporosis is a bone disease that leads to an increased risk of fracture. In osteoporosis, the bone mineral density (BMD) is reduced, bone microarchitecture is disrupted, and the amount and variety of non-collagenous proteins in bone is altered. The disease is most common in women after menopause, but may also develop in men. Given the risk of fragility structure, osteoporosis may significantly affect life expectancy and quality of life. Osteoporosis can be prevented with lifestyle changes and sometimes medication. Lifestyle changes include preventing falls (including exercise to tone ambulatory muscles, proprioception-improvement exercises, and equilibrium therapies) and exercise (with its anabolic effect); medication includes calcium, vitamin D, biphosphonates and several others. 
        Regular sessions will include: causes of osteoporosis, its mechanisms, risk factors, and prevention through lifestyle modification. 

PLENARY SESSION 9: LIFESTYLE FACTORS AND SENILE DEMENTIA

         Alzheimer's disease (AD), or senile dementia of the Alzheimer's type (SDAT), the most common form of dementia, is a degenerative and terminal disease. Although generally diagnosed in people over 65 years of age, the less prevalent early onset AD can occur much earlier. An estimated 26.65 million people worldwide had AD in 2006 and this number may quadruple by year 2050. AD is one of the most economically costly diseases to society. Although each sufferer experiences AD in a unique way, there are many common symptoms (early memory loss, followed by confusion, inability and aggression, mood swings, language breakdown, long term memory loss, general withdrawal and decline, loss of bodily functions, and ultimately death).   
        The earliest symptoms are often mistakenly thought to be age-related concerns or manifestations of stress. The cause and progression of AD are not well understood. Research indicates that the disease is associated with plaques and tangles in the brain. Many measures have been suggested for the prevention of AD, but their value is unproven in slowing the course and reducing the severity of the disease. Mental stimulation, exercise, and a balanced diet are often recommended as both a possible prevention and a sensible way of managing the disease.    
        Regular sessions will include: characteristics of dementia (pre-, early, moderate, and advanced dementia), causes, mechanisms, risk factors, and prevention through lifestyle modification. 

PLENARY SESSION 10: LIFESTYLE FACTORS AND ARTHRITIS

        There are over 100 different forms of arthritis. The most common form, "osteoarthritis" (degenerate joint disease) is a result of trauma to the joint, infection of the joint, or age. Other arthritis forms are "rheumatoid arthritis", "psoriatic arthritis", and "autoimmune diseases" in which the body attacks itself. "Septic arthritis" is caused by joint infection. "Gouty arthritis" is caused by deposition of uric acid crystals in the joint causing inflammation.  Other forms include "juvenile idiopathic arthritis", "Still's disease", and "ankylosing spondylitis".
        Treatment options vary depending on the type of arthritis and include physical therapy, lifestyle changes (including exercise and weight control), orthopedic bracing, medications, and dietary supplements (symptomatic or targeted at the disease process causing the arthritis). Arthroplasty (joint replacement surgery) may be required in eroding forms of arthritis.
In general, studies have shown that physical exercise of the joint affected can have noticeable improvement in terms of  long-term pain relief. Furthermore, exercise of the arthritic joint is encouraged to maintain the health of the particular joint and the overall body of the person.
        Regular sessions will focus on lifestyle changes (exercise including physical exercise of the joint, weight control) and their benefit in selected forms of arthritis.


PLENARY SESSION 11: LIFESTYLE FACTORS AND DEGENERATIVE DISEASES


             A degenerative disease is a disease in which the function or structure of the affected tissues or organs will progressively deteriorate over time, whether due to normal bodily wear or lifestyle choices such as exercise or eating habits. Some examples of degenerative diseases include: amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) such as, for example, Lou Gehrig's disease; Alzheimer's disease; Parkinson's disease; multiple system atrophy; Niemann Pick disease; atherosclerosis; progressive supranuclear palsy; cancer; Tay-Sachs disease; diabetes; heart disease; keratoconus; inflammatory bowel disease (IBD); prostatitis; osteoarthritis; osteoporosis; rheumatoid arthritis; Huntington's disease.  
        Regular sessions will focus on some of the degenerative diseases not covered in other sessions and will describe the benefits of lifestyle changes.


PLENARY SESSION 12: LIFESTYLE FACTORS AND HIV/AIDS 

        Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome) (AIDS) is a disease of the human immune system caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This condition progressively reduces the effectiveness of the immune system and leaves individuals susceptible to opportunistic infections and tumors. 
HIV is transmitted through direct  contact of a mucous membrane or the blood stream with a bodily fluid containing HIV, such as blood, semen, vaginal fluid, preseminal fluid, and breast milk. It is possible to find HIV in the saliva, tears and urine of infected individuals, but there are no recorded cases of infection by these secretions, and the risk of infection is negligible.     
        The three main transmission routes are sexual contact, exposure to infected body fluids or tissues (including blood transfusion, contaminated hypodermic needles), and from mother to fetus or child during pregnancy, perinatal period, childbirth, breastfeeding or other exposure to one of the above bodily fluids.
        Although treatment for AIDS and HIV can slow the course of the disease, there is currently no vaccine or cure. Antiretroviral treatment reduces both the mortality and the morbidity of HIV infection, but these drugs are expensive and routine access to antiretroviral medication is not available in all countries. Due to the difficulty in treating HIV infection, preventing infection is a key aim in controlling the AIDS pandemic, with health organizations promoting safe sex and needle-exchange programmes in attempts to slow the spread of the virus. Failing that, if and where available, treatment consists in the administration of  an antiretroviral directly after a highly significant exposure. called post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP).
        Regular sessions will concentrate on lifestyle changes based on infection avoidance approaches.

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                                                                                         Support of the:
                                                            
THIRD INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM OF THE 
                                ASSOCIATION OF OBSTETRICIANS AND GYNECOLOGISTS OF QUEBEC (AOGQ)

                                                                                                            and
                                                FIFTH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE OF SURGERY OF THE
                                                            NEW EUROPEAN SURGERY ACADEMY (NESA)


                                                            Palma de Majorque, Spain, 13-15 September 2012
                                                                 http://www.uspnesadays.com/fr/index.html


        The  meeting is jointly organized by the Association of Obstetricians and Gynecologists of Quebec  (AOGQ), Dr. Robert Sabbah, MD, President and Director of the International Institute of Medicine and Science, Inc. and the New European Surgical Academy (NESA), Dr. Michael Stark, MD, President. 
        The Innovation Days USP NESA 2012 will be held 13-15 September 2012 in collaboration with the Society of Laparoscopic Surgeons (SLS) , the International Academy of Medicine and Laser Surgery (IAMLS) and AOGQ.  The AOGQ Day will be held 14 September 2012. 
        The theme of the Symposium and Conference will be "Innovations in Surgery and Telesurgery" with aim to allow surgeons, gynecologists and urologists to update their skills in novel surgical modalities so as to apply them in their daily practice.
        The International Scientific Board includes representatives from Austria, Brazil, Bulgaria, Canada, China, Denmark, Dubai, France, Germany, Greece, Israel, Italy, Japan, Romania, Spain, Sweden, Turkey, and the U.S.A.
        The Program includes the following Sessions: 

KEYNOTE LECTURES:  

        "When will videoendoscopy replace almost all the open surgeries?"
        "Natural orifice surgery: State of the Art" 
        
"The future of telesurgery"

INTERDISCIPLINARY SESSIONS I:

        "National experience with focused ultrasound"
        "Novelties in endoscopy"
        "Modern anesthesiology in modern surgery"
        " The results of the first three years of the introduction of the safety checklist"

LASER SESSION:

        "Scientific research and clinical practice" 
        "Pain control with LLL therapy"
        "Phenothiazines molecular modifications at interaction with laser beams"
        "The use of laser in gynecology - reconsideration" 

INTERDISCIPLINARY SESSION II:

       "Surgical surprises during operative laparoscopy"
        "Ten-step vaginal hysterectomy: Standardizing the vaginal approach"
        "Comparison of endoscopy to a novel telesurgical system with haptic sensation"
        
MEDICAL EDUCATION: 

        "The International Medical School"
        "Novel concepts in the medical curriculum"
        "E-learning and telelearning"

ANTIBIOTICS AND CHEMOTHERAPY IN SURGERY:

        "Antibiotics and caesarean section - A paradigm shift"
        "Modern trends in chemotherapy in breast cancer"
        "The WHO's Safe Surgery Saves Lives Project for ensuring timing and dosage of antibiotics"
        
ETHICS AND SURGERY:

        "A bioethical reflection on new surgical perspectives and progress in surgical methods in 
          respect with human and ethical dimensions"
        "Ethical aspects of surgery from a Reverend's point of view"
        "How ethical issues changed the surgical practice"

PROPHYLACTIC SALPINGECTOMY: Panel discussion

SERIAL MONITORING OF CHROMOSOMIC MALFORMATIONS: Panel discussion 

NOVELTIES IN VPH VACCINATIONS AND NEW DIRECTIONS IN QUEBEC: Panel discussion

TELESURGERY:

        "A novel telesurgical concept and system with haptic sensation"
        "First clinical studies"
        "Telesurgery in the United States 2000-2010"
        "Telesurgery and urology"
        "Telesurgery in Italy"

NOVELTIES IN ENDOSCOPY:

        "How laparotomy became history"
        "Video-assisted laparoscopic treatment of endometriosis of bowel, bladder, ureter, liver, 
          lung and diaphragm"
        "How endoscopy replaced open surgery in Turkey"
        "The international prospect of the usage of endoscopy"
        "Endoscopical treatment of endometriosis"

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES AND THEIR UTILITY IN GYNECOLOGY: Panel discussion

ROBOTICS IN GYNECO-ONCOLOGY: Panel discussion

INFERTILITY I:

        "Ageing ovaries DHEA"
        "Fertiloscope - State of the art"
        "Fertility preservation"
        "Egg banking"
        "Effect of estradiol level after HCG administration on IVF success rate"
        "An update in myomectomy for infertile patients: Robotic, laparoscopic or abdominal?

NOVELTIES IN SURGICAL HYSTEROSCOPY: Panel discussion 

FETAL THERAPY: INTRA- AND EXTRA-UTERINE SURGERY: Panel discussion

HANDLING OF GEMELLAR PREGNANCIES: Panel discussion

INFERTILITY II:

        "IVF in developing countries"
        
"Vitrification"
        "FMR1 gene and predictive value in ART"
        "Cross-border fertility treatments"
        "Embryo selection"
        "In vitro oocyte maturation"

MODERN TREATMENT OF ENDOMETRIOSIS: MEDICAL TREATMENT VERSUS SURGERY: Panel discussion

CAESAREAN SECTION IN THE 21st CENTURY:

        "The optimal evidence-based caesarean section"
        "Leave the perironeum open and prevent adhesions"
        "Caesarean section in Northern Europe"
        "Caesarean section in West Africa"
        "Caesaean section in the course of history"

INNOVATIONS IN OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY I:

        "Distribution of substance P and vasoactive intestinal peptide in pseudocapsules in uterine fibroids"
        "Gynecological endoscopy - Quo Vadis?
        "Feasibility of vaginal myomectomy: the culdotomic approach"
        "How could we provide least ovarian damage and most ovarian reserve in endometrioma excision?

PREVENTIVE MEDICINE:

        "Safe surgery saves lives"
        "Implementation of safe surgery in a large surgical center"
        "Nutrition and health"

INNOVATIONS IN OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY II: 

        "The uterine fibroid story to rewrite in the light of new scientific evidences"
        "Video-assisted laparoscopic hysterectomy for severe endometriosis and large myoma"
        "Placenta accreta and its total management"
        "Management of uterine rupture during pregnancy"

NATURAL ORIFICE SURGERY:

        "The transoral thyroidectomy - From theory to practice"
        "Ductoscopy in the diagnosis of breast cancer - State of the art"
        "The future of abdominal surgery"
        "The use of the pouch of Douglas for assessment of infertility"
        "The potential of the pouch of Douglas as a port for intra-abdominal surgery"

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Sponsorship of the:
                                                     INAUGURAL MEETING AND FIRST INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE
 SOCIETY FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE IN AFRICA (SASA)

                                                             Polokwane, South Africa, April 25-28, 2013
                                                                  http://www.sasascience.org


The Society for the Advancement of Science in Africa (SASA) is being launched by African scientists (both residing abroad and in Africa) and participant scientists friends of Africa from the U.S.A., Canada, Europe, China, India, Brazil, and Russia. It hopes to establish scholarly cooperation and sharing of ideas established scientific institutions.

The Conference is sponsored by the following entities:
"Department of Science and Technology" (Pretoria, South Africa)
"DNABiotec" (Pretoria, South Africa)
"Embassy of Switzerland in South Africa"
"European, Middle Eastern, & African Society for Biopreservation and Biobanking" (Verona, Italy)
"Global Knowledge Initiative" (Washington, D.C., USA)
"High Commission of Canada in South Africa" (Pretoria, South Africa)
"International Institute of Medicine and Science" (Rancho Mirage, California, USA)
"National University of Science & Technology, School of Electrical Engineering & Computer Science, Pakistan
"University of Limpopo" (Turfloop Campus, Polokwane, South Africa)
"York University" (Ontario, Canada)

The Program includes the following Sessions:  


KEYNOTE ADDRESSES: 
"Fostering Science and Technology Partnerships in Africa"
"Twinning Between Institutions in Developed and Less Developed Countries: An Ideal Way to Set-up an
Astrophysics Program"
"The Square Kilometer Array (SKA)"

PLENARY SESSIONS:
"Integrity in Epidemiology as the Science Basic to Rational Public Health Policy: Conflicting Interests at Work"
"African Indigenous healing Practices"
"Promotion of Science Under Political Restrictions and International Sanctions"
"European, Middle Eastern and Africa Society for Biopreservation and Biobanking (ESBB): Promoting the Collection of Materials in Africa"
"Advancing African Science Through Advocating a Multicultural Education System"
"Intellectual Property of Africa"
"Surgery in Africa: Strategies to Address an Ignored Necessity"
"Implementing Sustainable Surgery Residency Education Programs: Example of Neurosurgery in Ethiopia"
" Introduction of Neuroradiology in the Teaching and Practice of Neurosurgery in the Developing World"
"Science in Africa: What? How? Where? Who?"
"International Collaboration on Science in Africa: Society to Society, Institution to Institution, People to People,Government to Government", "Country to Country"
"Science in Africa: The Vision, the Challenges, Hurdles and Pitfalls"

POSTERS AND WORKSHOPS:
"Do FASD and ADHD Represent a Disease Spectrum Disorder? A Correlation Analysis of the Genetic and Epigenetic Susceptibility and Disease Severity Assuming an FASD/ADHD Disease Spectrum Disorder Model"
"A Systems Biology Approach to Model the Glutathione Pathway in Plasmodium Falciparum"
""Intellectual Property (IP)"
"Creating Biomedical Ventures"


SCIENTIFIC SESSION I: "African Indigenous ("Green") Medicine"
"African Indigenous Remedies as a New Paradigm for Sustainable Health Care Systems"
"Neem Patch: An Excellent Topical Ulcer Treatment with Limited Use"
"The Use of Neem for Pest Management"


SCIENTIFIC SESSION II: "Social Sciences Research"
"A Provision and Need of HIV/AIDS Services Within the City of Tshwane Metropolitan Municipality 2010-2011"
"
Follow-Up of HIV Positive Donors Who Come for Counseling: Did We Miss Any Risk Factors?"
"Maternal Mortality in Sub-Sahara Africa and Practical Solutions to Combat the Incidence of Mortality"
"Dissemination of Science Into Developing Communities: Community Engagement by Higher Education Institutions - A Practical Model and Guidelines"
"Probiotics for Africa: Challenges and Opportunities for Health and Human Development"


SCIENTIFIC SESSION III: "Biomedical Research"

"Musculoskeletal Health in the African Continent"
"Environmental Endocrine Disrupter Chemical Exposure: Environmental and Human Health Effects"  
"Differential Diagnosis of Developmental Delay: A Community Perspective"
"The Growing Problem of Multi-Drug Resistant (MRSA) in Africa: A Health Care and Community Issue"
"Genomics for Africa"


SCIENTIFIC SESSION IV: "Biotechnology Research" "Demographic Patterns of Blood Donors and Donations in South Africa"
"SANBS: An Evolution of Molecular and Immunohematology Testing"
"Specialized Laboratory Services Immunohematology: The South Africa National Blood Service Experience"
"Supporting Life Science in Emerging Countries"


SCIENTIFIC SESSION V: "The Business of Science & Engineering"

"Innovation Success in Africa"
"Entrepreneurship in Africa"
"Assessment of the Need to Improve Bridge Management in Uganda: An Inter-Disciplinary Approach"
"Two real-World Implementations Leveraging Information Communication Technology (ICT) and Mobile Communication Technology (MCT) to Administer and Manage Healthcare Delivery Remotely for Addressing Problems in the African Subcontinent"
"Applied Molecular Pathology and tele-pathology: A Mean to Improve Diagnosis in Africa"
"Science for Africa: Lessons from the Biotech Sector in South Africa"


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Sponsorship of the:

          SECOND ANNUAL INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE OF THE
 SOCIETY FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE IN AFRICA (SASA)

                                                            Kampala, Uganda, May 5-10, 2014
                                                                 http://www.sasascience.net                                                   


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Sponsorship of the:

          THIRD ANNUAL INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE OF THE
 SOCIETY FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE IN AFRICA (SASA)
SCIENCE RESEARCH AND EDUCATION IN AFRICA
                                                            Toronto, Canada, August 28 - 31, 2015
                                                                 http://www.sasascience.org 

The Conference was sponsored by the following entities:
Commission for University education (CUE), Keny.
Global Knowledge Initiative (GKI), USA
International Institute of Medicine and Science, USA Nabinsusa Girls Secondary School (NGSS), Uganda
National Commission for Science, Technology and Innovation (NACOSTI), Kenya
Sudanese Academy of Sciences, Sudan
Uganda National Council for Science and Technology (UNCST), Uganda
Participating Universities:
British Columbia University, Canada
Cambridge University, England
Gulu University, Uganda
Makerere University, Uganda
Maseno University, Uganda
McMaster University, Canada
Muni University, Uganda
Nairobi University, Kenya
Ryerson University, Canada
University of Toronto, Canada
York University, Canada 

The Program included the following Sessions:  

WELCOMING REMARKS:
Prof. Joachim Kapalanga,
 Western University, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Ontario, Canada and SASA Executive President and Board Chair

WELCOMING ADDRESSES:
Prof. Angela Hildyard, Vice President, University of Toronto
"The Challenges of Leadership in the Scientific Community"

Prof. Glen A. Jones, Interim Dean
Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto, Canada
"Welcome from the Dean of the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto, Canada

PRESIDENTIAL ADDRESS: 
Prof. Joachim Kapalanga, SASA Executive President and Board Chair
"Missionary Science in Africa: A Policy Opinion on the Advancement of Science in Africa"

KEYNOTE ADDRESSES: 


AFRICA
Prof. Catherine A. Odora Hoppers, University of South Africa
Science and Technology in Africa: Research Without Programmes, Scientists Without Communities - An African Perspective of Knowledge Development and Policy Reforms"

Prof. Lucy W. Irungu, University of Nairobi, Kenya
"Best Practices in Integrating University Research, Innovation and Outreach to Foster National Development"

Prof. David N. Ndetei, University of Nairobi, Kenya
"Building Inter-Institutional Collaboration for Mental Health Research and Services from Community Level to International Level - The Kenyan Experience"

INTERNATIONAL:

Prof. Ronald Laporte, University of Pittsburgh

INVITED ADDRESSES:

Prof. David W. Dunne, University of Cambridge, England
"Assisting African Universities to Accelerate and Sustain Progress in Sub-Sahara Africa"

Dr. Eusebius J. Mukhwana, Commission for University Education, Kenya
"Policies to Support Quality University Teaching and Research in Kenya"

Prof. Alain L. Fymat, International Institute of Medicine and Science, California, USA and SASA Vice Board Chair and Science Director
"Perspectives on Drug Manufacturing in Africa"

Prof. Balakrishna Shetty, Sri Siddharta University Tumkur, India and SASA Vice President (ASIA)
"The SASA-Mediated India-Uganda Teleradiology Project"

PLENARY SESSION 1: "Improving Health Research & Disease Surveillance Education"

SESSION 1: "Infectious Diseases"
Moderator: Prof. Cynthia Maxwell, Mt Sinai and University of Toronto, Canada
"Just-in-Time Synthesis and Communication of Scientific Knowledge to Millions of People During the Ebola Virus Disease Outbreak"
"Caring for Ebola Patients: The Nursing experience During a Large Deadly Ebola Epidemic in Northern Uganda"
"Promoting ARV Adherence Amongst Adolescents Through Peer Support Groups: A Case Study of TABO in Entebbe, Uganda"
"Socio-Economic Burden of Living with HIV/AIDS in Hard to Reach Sub-Counties in Northern Uganda"

SESSION 2: "Chronic Diseases"
  Moderator: Prof. David Zakus,
Ryerson University, Canada
"Maternal Fetal Medicine"
"Pathology of Placenta in Fetal and Neonatal Thrombocytopenia: Roles of Th17 Immune Responses, Anti- Platelet Antibodies and Angiogenic Factors" 
"Effects of Long-Term Autophagy Inhibition with Chloroquine on the Development and Progression of Experimental Abdominal Aneurysms"
"Mitigating Cancer Incidence in the Great Lakes Region: A Case of the National Cancer Awareness Association (NACAS), Uganda"
"Using African Indigenous Food Crops as Local remedy Against Chronic Diseases"
"Use of Public Health and Afro-Centric Methods to Increase Cancer Screening in an Immigrant Population"

PLENARY SESSION 2: "Community-Based Research & Education"

SESSION 3: "Community-Based Healthcare"
 Moderator: Prof. Njoki Wane, University of Toronto, Canada and SASA Vice President (North America)
 and Dr Francis Akena Adyanga, University of Toronto and SASA Board Member

"Community-Based Approaches in Health and Well-Being inEast Africa"
"A Community-Based Intervention for Maternal Depression in Rwanda"
"Development of an Impact Evaluation Model and Toolkt for Community-Based Rehabilitation""
"Evaluating a Pooled Incentive Model in Engaging and Retaining Community Health Volunteers in a Primary Health Care Program in Western Kenya"
"Community Health Worker Training and Education in a Refugee Context"
"Community University Partnership to Build Participatory Digital Assistive Technology"

SESSION 4: "Social Aspects of Science Education and Research"
Moderator: Prof. Margareth Santos Zanchetta, Ryerson University, Canada
"Synthesizing Local and International Social Work Theory and Practice in Rwanda"
"A Commercial Bank's Approach to Revitalizing Rural Economies in Uganda"
"Science and Education s remedies of Youth Unemployment"
"Re-reading Science and Research: Praxis of 'Mugamo Tree'"
"Black Canadian Presence in the 'Great White North': Problematizing Colonial Myths"
"The Impact of the Media Towards Advancement and Promotion of Better and Improved Health in Uganda"
"Planetary Health Commission"
"Affirmative Action on Behalf of Females at the University of Zambia"

PLENARY SESSION 3: "Strengthening Research and Education"

SESSION 5: "Developing Future Science Education Programs"
Moderator: Prof. Alain L. Fymat, 
International Institute of Medicine and Science, California, USA and SASA   Vice Board Chair and Science Director

"Master in International Health and Nutrition Policy: An Impact Evaluation Over the Practice of French- Speaking Professionals"
"A Unique and Useful Partnership Between Canadian and Rwandan Urologists - A Work in Progres"
"The Impact of Armed Conflict on the Development of Science Education Program in Northern Uganda"
"Bold Ideas with Big Impact: Funding opportunities in Global Health"


SESSION 6: "Developing Research Training"
 Moderator: Dr. Eusebius J. Mukhwana, Commission for Higher Education, Kenya

"Strengthening Research Training: Micro-Research Training and Benefits at a Medical College in Ethiopia"
"Fostering Quality and Relevance in PostGraduate Research Training"


SESSION 7: "African Indigenous Knowledge"
 Moderator: Prof. Njoki Wane, University of Toronto, Canada and SASA Vice President (North America)

"The Centrality of African Indigenous Knowledge in Development"
"An Emerging Future: An Indigenous Perspective Related to Understanding the Nature of the Quantum Biological Human Being"
"A Study of the Impact and Gentrification on Small Ethnic Retail Grocery Stores in Regent Park, Toronto"

PANEL DISCUSSIONS:

1. Research and Education in Africa
Moderator: Prof. David M. Ndetei, University of Nairobi, Kenya
Panelists: Dr. Michaela Hynie, Prof. Lucy W. Irungu, Dr. Eusebius J. Mukhwana, Prof. Catherine A. Odora-Hoppers, Prof. Njoki Wane

2. Health Research & Development in Africa
Moderator: Prof. Catherine A. Odora Hoppers, University of South Africa
Panelists: Prof. Emmanuel Abara, Prof. Sam Lanfranco, Prof. Ronald Laporte, Prof. Cynthia Maxwell ,
Prof. David M. Ndetei, Ms Akoth Jane Val

3. Women in Science and Technology
Moderator: Prof. Njoki Wane, University of Toronto and SASA Vice President (North America)
Panelists: Prof. Lucy W. Irungu, Prof. Catherine A. Odora-Hoppers, Prof. F. Beryl  Pilkington


4. Women in Science and Technology
Moderator: Prof. Sam Lanfranco, York University, Canada
Panelists: Prof. Ronald Laporte, Prof. David Zakus, Prof. Alain L. Fymat, Prof. Lucy W. Irungu


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